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Archive for February, 2013|Monthly archive page

Story

In "The Way It Was", 3-Wilhelmina (Bee) Garris King 1918-2007, Bee Stories, FAMILY: BEE & BOB TOGETHER, Round O, S.C., STORIES on February 17, 2013 at 7:23 am

All porches were covered and the breezeway was the spaces between house and kitchen.

— “The Way It Was,” Chapter One: “The House,” 1999

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Story

In "The Way It Was", 2-William B. Garris 1879-1949, 3-Wilhelmina (Bee) Garris King 1918-2007, Bee Stories, FAMILY: BEE & BOB TOGETHER, FAMILY: PATERNAL LINE (BEE), Round O, S.C., STORIES on February 17, 2013 at 7:14 am

If the front porch could repeat some of the conversation that have been made down during the years , it would be a very interesting story. Our house was where all the preachers would meet and socialize. There was a Dr. and Mrs. Danner came every summer for a week. Preachers all tell jokes and funny yarns that they had heard or had happened to them in their work. We would sit on the porch and listen to them to all times of night. On summer nights we would sit on the porch in rockers, talk over the day, and watch car lights play on the side of the store. Daddy used to say that we didn’t need movies, we could watch this.

Sunday afternoons we sat on the porch, read, watched traffic and talked. Winter nights we built a fire in the fire place and sat around talking, reading, studying. All this has been lost now in the world of radio , television and computers. I missed it when my own children were growing up because it seemed like we lost a lot by not discussing things more.

— “The Way It Was,” Chapter Eight: “The Front Porch,” 1999

Photograph

In 1980s & 1990s, 3-Wilhelmina (Bee) Garris King 1918-2007, FAMILY: BEE & BOB TOGETHER, POSTS, Round O, S.C. on February 17, 2013 at 6:40 am

album page photo 2

album page from round o

(Editor’s note: If you click on the top photo with the porches, to enlarge, you will note Bee/Momma/Grandma in the lower left-hand corner. Based on where this photo was located in her albums, I think it may have been taken either when she and Bob/Daddy/Granddaddy went down for Howard’s funeral, or sometime after that to visit Floy. Anyone else have a guess on the year?)

Story

In "The Way It Was", -- Rebecca Hoffman Fox 1829-1911, -- Thomas Miles Dodd 1826-1880, 3-Wilhelmina (Bee) Garris King 1918-2007, Bee Stories, FAMILY: BEE & BOB TOGETHER, FAMILY: MATERNAL LINE (BEE), Round O, S.C., STORIES on February 10, 2013 at 6:10 am

My family had lived in my great grand parents house for several years and I guess I was born in one of those rooms. It consisted of five rooms: including our kitchen and dining room . The smoke house,( their kitchen) and the two rooms behind the store were probably a parlor and a dining room.

The smoke house was filled with hams, sausage, shoulders, sides of pork hanging on strings from ceiling, sausage. One process of curing the meat was to build a fire underneath and the smoke would help cure the meat and give it that delicious flavor..

— “The Way It Was,” Chapter One: “The House,” 1999

Country Ham with Red Eye Gravy

In 2-Minnie Anna (Sister) Dodd Garris 1874-1957, 3-Wilhelmina (Bee) Garris King 1918-2007, FAMILY: BEE & BOB TOGETHER, FAMILY: MATERNAL LINE (BEE) on February 10, 2013 at 6:09 am

4 slices country-cured ham

Wash slices (but do not soak as other recipes say)

Put slices into ungreased heavy skillit at fairly high heat. Fry each side a few minutes until brown.

Add 1 cup boiling water. Let all boil up and scrap all “fry” from bottom so that it gets into gravy. Reduce heat & let simmer 20 minutes covered. Serve with hot grits and fried eggs.

(Editor’s note: This recipe was originally posted here online in December 2009, when we were preparing to celebrate New Year’s. Grandma/Momma/Bee dates this recipe back to 1930, in the “Low Country.”)

Collards a la New Bern

In 3-Wilhelmina (Bee) Garris King 1918-2007, FAMILY: BEE & BOB TOGETHER on February 10, 2013 at 6:06 am

1 country hamhock
1/2 cup bacon grease
1 small strip sidemeat
3 stalks of collards, thoroughly washed & cut up in narrow stripes.

After meat has cooked up well, add collards & let cook together for 1 1/2 hours. Collards and cornbread go well together. Serve with plain vinegar or little sweet pickles as Daddy always wanted.

May be chopped up after cooking with biscuit cutter & much easier.

(Editor’s note: This recipe was originally posted here online in December 2009, when we were preparing to celebrate New Year’s. Grandma/Momma/Bee dates this recipe to 1950 in New Bern, before the house at Tryon Road and back when they lived at 605 Franklin Street. The above photos are Collards a la Aunt Boyd, made for Thanksgiving 2009.)

Story

In "The Way It Was", -- Rebecca Hoffman Fox 1829-1911, -- Thomas Miles Dodd 1826-1880, 3-Howard Garris 1906-1990, 3-Wilhelmina (Bee) Garris King 1918-2007, 4-William (Billy) King 1954-, Bee Stories, FAMILY: BEE & BOB TOGETHER, FAMILY: BROTHER & SISTERS (BEE), FAMILY: MATERNAL LINE (BEE), Round O, S.C., STORIES on February 3, 2013 at 8:05 am

As was the custom in those days, the kitchen and dining room were completely separate from the rest of the house. We went out of the house through a breeze way into the kitchen and dining room. It had been a part of the house that Great Grandma Becky and Great Grandpa Thomas Miles Dodd had lived in. The rest of their house was added on to the back of the store, and the smoke house had been their kitchen.

There was a large kitchen with a large wood burning range with a warming closet and a hot water tank on the stove, tables, running water from our artesian well and carbide lights. Off to one side was a large pantry , as long as the whole kitchen filled with jars of canned vegetables, fruits, pickles, jams , preserved that Mamma had fixed. There was a coffee mill to grind coffee as it was bought in the bean form. There would be home cured meat brought in from the smoke house which had been my great grand parent’s kitchen. Nuts, beans, grits and corn meal all from home grown supplies. The beans and peas were dried from the fresh beans that Daddy raised in the summer. In the summer we always had more fruit and vegetables than we could use. We divided with everybody.

In the dining room was a long table with a buffet to the side. In fact it is the one that Billy has now., and Howard later refinished it. The reason for the house and kitchen always be separate was to keep odors and grease from getting from the kitchen into the house. Also to cut down on the chances on the house burning if the kitchen caught on fire.

— “The Way It Was,” Chapter One: “The House,” 1999

Pickles

In 2-Minnie Anna (Sister) Dodd Garris 1874-1957, 3-Wilhelmina (Bee) Garris King 1918-2007, FAMILY: BEE & BOB TOGETHER, FAMILY: MATERNAL LINE (BEE) on February 3, 2013 at 6:45 am

7 lbs medium size pickles

Slice 1/2 inch thick & let stand 24 hours in 2 cups of lime & 2 gal water.

Then rinse & let stand in cold water 4 hours, drain well & cover with
2 qts vinegar,
4 1/2 lbs or 9 cups sugar
1 teaspoon celery seed
1 teaspoon pickling spices
1 teaspoon ground mustard
1 tablespoon salt.

Let stand overnight, then boil 25 min & seal while hot.

(Editor’s note: The writing on this recipe has been smeared — probably from a lot of time spent on a kitchen counter — so if any of you think the amounts I typed here are off, please say so. Do you think it really calls for 7 pounds of cucumbers, and 2 quarts of vinegar? I am guessing the “boil” part is after you’ve put the ingredients into canning jars.)

recipe pickles

recipe pickles BACK

My Momma’s Fried Bread

In 2-Minnie Anna (Sister) Dodd Garris 1874-1957, 3-Evelyn Floy Garris 1910-1997, 3-Wilhelmina (Bee) Garris King 1918-2007, FAMILY: BEE & BOB TOGETHER, FAMILY: BROTHER & SISTERS (BEE), FAMILY: MATERNAL LINE (BEE) on February 3, 2013 at 6:00 am

Grandma Garris

As given to me:
“1 Quart flour
1/2 C. (shortening) lard
1/4 t soda
1/2 t salt
1 egg
1 cup sour milk

Roll thin & fry in hot lard”

1 quart of flour is about 4 cups. I got an idea flour was plain. Lard was all she had and used. She mixed it together & rolled it out like you were make a pie crust. Then cut into rectangular strips & fried. They puffed up & there was space inside. You could stuff it with homemade fig preserves & eaten hot. They were out of this world. I’ve never been able to make them. Aunt Floy makes them beautifully.

(Editor’s note: This recipe was originally posted here online in July 2009, when we were trying to figure out a recipe for hushpuppies. I can imagine these could be the culprits behind a kitchen fire …)