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Archive for March, 2013|Monthly archive page

Story

In "The Way It Was", 2-Minnie Anna (Sister) Dodd Garris 1874-1957, 3-Wilhelmina (Bee) Garris King 1918-2007, Bee Stories, FAMILY: BEE & BOB TOGETHER, FAMILY: MATERNAL LINE (BEE), Round O, S.C., STORIES on March 31, 2013 at 8:29 am

Mamma had started her store as a milliner and designed and dressed hats or one could get the flowers , feathers, ribbons that they wanted put on a hat and she could fix it like a special order. Mamma started out having things to sell that Grandpa didn’t have but he would add anything so she also widened her stock as she went along.

There was a Good Homes sewing machine in the back of the store . You could sew by peddling the pedal on it. Mamma made all of our clothes. on that machine. She would take down a bolt of cloth from the store and cut her dress from that . She made her own patterns. You could tell her what you wanted or cut out picture that you saw in a magazine or catalog. I used to complain because she needed to fix it on me so much .and I would get so tired. It’s always been a mystery to me how my mother got so much done. She did everything it seemed to me..

— “The Way It Was,” Chapter Twelve: “THE STORE,” 1999

Photograph

In 1930s & Before, 2-Minnie Anna (Sister) Dodd Garris 1874-1957, FAMILY: MATERNAL LINE (BEE), POSTS on March 31, 2013 at 8:23 am

minnie anna dodd garris

minnie anna dodd garris BACK

minnie anna dodd garris scanned by julie anna

(Editor’s note: This is Minnie Anna Dodd Garris, as featured in the Dodd family history collage assembled by George Stack.)

Photograph

In 1930s & Before, 2-Minnie Anna (Sister) Dodd Garris 1874-1957, FAMILY: MATERNAL LINE (BEE), POSTS, Round O, S.C. on March 30, 2013 at 6:00 am

(Editor’s note: We originally posted this photo here on the blog in November 2009. There’s no writing on the back, but this is Minnie Anna Dodd Garris — as Grandma/Momma/Bee would say, “My Mother at Round O.”)

Story

In "The Way It Was", 2-Minnie Anna (Sister) Dodd Garris 1874-1957, 3-Wilhelmina (Bee) Garris King 1918-2007, Bee Stories, FAMILY: BEE & BOB TOGETHER, FAMILY: MATERNAL LINE (BEE), Round O, S.C., STORIES, Walterboro, S.C. on March 17, 2013 at 8:29 am

I have spoken of the store before but I was raised in the store. We sold groceries (Of course there were no fresh vegetables , fruit or frozen foods). However since our customers lived on farms they actually only needed staple things., including fat back meat. We also sold cloth by the yard, lace, buttons, thread, ladies ready made dresses , children’s clothing, underwear, shoes. and hats. She sold candy, penny candy, fresh bakery cakes and breads, toys, You could say it was a small size department store.

Mamma always said that I could eat all the candy I wanted , but I ate very little because I soon tired of it and hardly ate any. I had one drink (Coca-Cola ) per day and I passed the same idea down to my own children. There was a large ice box in the store and you could put a large cake of ice in it from the top. The ice came down from Watlterboro. I Can’t remember if it were a 50 or 100 pounds but it was large.

— “The Way It Was,” Chapter Twelve: “THE STORE,” 1999

Photograph

In "Colleton County: A Pictorial History", 1930s & Before, POSTS, STORIES, Walterboro, S.C. on March 17, 2013 at 8:20 am

colleton county a pictoral history page 72 coca coca

“The Walterboro Coca Cola Bottling Works was operated by the T.J. McDaniel family for many years. Pictured here ca. 1913.”

— “Colleton County: A Pictorial History,” Chapter Five: “Early Twentieth Century (1900-1940),” 1994

Photograph

In "Around Walterboro, South Carolina", 1930s & Before, POSTS, STORIES, Walterboro, S.C. on March 17, 2013 at 8:15 am

around walterboro sc page 55 coca cola

“In 1922, T.J. McDaniel organized the Coca-Cola Bottling Company in Walterboro. They started out with two mules and a horse, but very soon they were using trucks. Everyone was so proud they took photos.”

— “Around Walterboro, South Carolina,” Chapter Four: “Out and About Town,” 1998

Story

In "The Way It Was", 3-Wilhelmina (Bee) Garris King 1918-2007, Bee Stories, FAMILY: BEE & BOB TOGETHER, Round O, S.C., STORIES on March 10, 2013 at 7:14 am

My earliest memories are in the store as that was where we spent our days. Our customers were mostly black (colored in those days – we would have thought it disrespectful to have called them black.} I knew everyone by name and they accepted me as a clerk even though I was a child. Not only clerking in the store , there was always sweeping, cleaning, straightening up the merchandise . Also all groceries came in 100 lb. sacks (we called them crocus bags or a tow sack) or barrels. So we had to weight out and package everything into 1 lb., 2 lb., 5 lb. & 10 lb. bags so we could sell it quickly. This was items like sugar, rice, grits, flour, lard, etc. I swept in front of the store every morning.

– “The Way It Was,” Introduction, 1999

Photographs

In 1980s & 1990s, 3-Wilhelmina (Bee) Garris King 1918-2007, FAMILY: BEE & BOB TOGETHER, POSTS, Round O, S.C. on March 10, 2013 at 7:13 am

album page photo 4

album page photo 2

album page from round o

(Editor’s note: If you click on the top photo with the porches, to enlarge, you can see Bee/Momma/Grandma! Based on where this photo was located in her albums, I think it may have been taken either when she and Bob/Daddy/Granddaddy went down for Howard’s funeral, or sometime after that to visit Floy. Anyone else have a guess on the year?)

Story

In "The Way It Was", 3-Wilhelmina (Bee) Garris King 1918-2007, Bee Stories, Colleton County, S.C., FAMILY: BEE & BOB TOGETHER, Round O, S.C., STORIES on March 10, 2013 at 7:12 am

During the day in the store we would have customers. Some would sit and chat for awhile in order to warm by the fire or to get the news of the day. The post office joined the store so some were getting their mail. Some would bring in corn, peas, chicken or eggs for exchange for other items. Salesmen whom we called drummers (drumming up trade) were in and out and had all kinds of thing s for sale. Most of them had their car full of merchandise trying to sell and if they didn’t have what you wanted, they would bring it the next week. Some took orders and then there were big delivery trucks which would bring goods that had been ordered a head.

— “The Way It Was,” Chapter Twelve: “THE STORE,” 1999

Story

In "The Way It Was", 2-Minnie Anna (Sister) Dodd Garris 1874-1957, 3-Howard Garris 1906-1990, 3-Wilhelmina (Bee) Garris King 1918-2007, Bee Stories, FAMILY: BEE & BOB TOGETHER, FAMILY: BROTHER & SISTERS (BEE), FAMILY: MATERNAL LINE (BEE), STORIES on March 3, 2013 at 9:34 am

This porch was filled with large rocking chairs with a double swing at one end. Back then we used to laugh about the swing on the porch because we would say that we didn’t want to inherit the swing or the pump organ (the organ you had to pump the pedals with your feet to make the tones or air pressures to be able to play). The swing was a double swing that swung back and forth. The organ was a predecessor of the organ that now runs by electricity and was used in all the churches. Mamma got rid of the Swings and Howard made a desk of the organ but I have wished many times since then that I had particularly the swing. Don’t make up your mind too early , because age seems to change your mind on what is important.

— “The Way It Was,” Chapter Eight: “The Front Porch,” 1999