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Archive for April, 2013|Monthly archive page

Story

In "The Way It Was", 1-Adeline (Addie) Kizer Dodd 1855-1937, 1-Joseph Hoffman Dodd 1852-1937, 3-Wilhelmina (Bee) Garris King 1918-2007, Bee Stories, FAMILY: BEE & BOB TOGETHER, FAMILY: MATERNAL LINE (BEE), STORIES on April 28, 2013 at 6:30 am

Grandma and Grandpa were the first in the community to have anything and every thing. They had their own electricity made from his own generator so they had everything that run by electricity. They had the first electric refrigerator in the community and Grandma said that we could have ice any time we wanted it, so many times I’ve been over and got ten a tray of ice. They also had the first radio. I remember going over on Saturday night and listening to the radio which I remember being mostly hillbilly music which we did not particularly like but had to listen to because it was coming over the radio. They also had a telephone and we did not have one so we went over there to make our phone calls and also to receive telephone calls. Someone would come for us. If you were calling someone you would say something like this: “Mary, I want to speak to George”. Nothing like calling now. They had the first “show case car” with roll up windows like we have now, Every one was afraid of that type cars because they thought if case of a wreck you would be cut to pieces with the breaking of the glass. We had a T Model Ford with open windows. Of course when we went to church , almost all people were in a buggy or even a wagon. So you can see the progress.

– “The Way It Was,” Chapter Ten: “Grandma and Grandpa Dodd,” 1999

Photograph

In "Colleton County: A Pictorial History", 1930s & Before, POSTS, Round O, S.C., STORIES on April 28, 2013 at 6:27 am

colleton county a pictorial history page 21 electric plant

“A Delco plant supplied electricity for Dodd’s Store and home in the early 1900’s.”

— “Colleton County: A Pictorial History,” Chapter One: “Prehistoric Era and Colonial Period,” 1994

Story

In "The Way It Was", 1-Adeline (Addie) Kizer Dodd 1855-1937, 1-Joseph Hoffman Dodd 1852-1937, 2-Annie (Gus) Dodd 1876-1955, 3-Wilhelmina (Bee) Garris King 1918-2007, Bee Stories, FAMILY: BEE & BOB TOGETHER, FAMILY: MATERNAL LINE (BEE), Round O, S.C., STORIES on April 28, 2013 at 6:00 am

I went to their house almost every day to take some thing to them or get some thing from them.. If Grandma was sick , Mamma would fix her soup. etc. and I’ve taken it over many times. Turnip soup was her very favorite, Sometimes I would go for some thing and sometimes I would just love to go to see them. They often sat on the porch in the summer and it would not unusual to find them sitting there holding hands. She being blind and he almost deaf by now. Aunt Gus worked in their store and she would always fix me a slab of cheese between two Johnny cakes. The cheese came from one of those big round cakes of cheese from the wooden box – probably weighed 25 pounds.

– “The Way It Was,” Chapter Ten: “Grandma and Grandpa Dodd,” 1999

Photographs

In 1-Adeline (Addie) Kizer Dodd 1855-1937, 1-Joseph Hoffman Dodd 1852-1937, 1930s & Before, FAMILY: MATERNAL LINE (BEE), POSTS on April 14, 2013 at 6:46 am

joseph hoffman dodd

adeline delilah kizer dodd

adeline delilah kizer dodd BACK

(Editor’s note: The top picture is Joseph Hoffman Dodd, as featured in the Dodd family history collage assembled by George Stack. The bottom is of Adeline Kizer Dodd, in a photo-postcard saved by Grandma/Momma/Bee. The back of the photo-postcard reads, “My Grandmother Adaline Kizer Dodd.”)

Story

In "The Way It Was", 1-Adeline (Addie) Kizer Dodd 1855-1937, 1-Joseph Hoffman Dodd 1852-1937, Bee Stories, FAMILY: MATERNAL LINE (BEE), Round O, S.C., STORIES on April 14, 2013 at 6:00 am

Grandpa had gone broke in business once and put the store and all business in Grandma’s name after that. It was the A.D. Dodd store which stood for Adeline Delilah Dodd. He was Joseph Hoffman Dodd.

They ran a country store that had everything Mamma had plus more. They sold fertilizer, seeds, insecticide, horse harness and everything else for animals.

– “The Way It Was,” Chapter Ten: “Grandma and Grandpa Dodd,” 1999

Photograph

In "Colleton County: A Pictorial History", 1-Adeline (Addie) Kizer Dodd 1855-1937, 1-Joseph Hoffman Dodd 1852-1937, 1930s & Before, FAMILY: MATERNAL LINE (BEE), POSTS, Round O, S.C., STORIES on April 14, 2013 at 5:53 am

colleton county a pictorial history page 20 dodd store

“Today ‘Round O’ means a small community on Highway 17-A, once referred to as Centerville on the Round O. Dodd’s Store, established in 1883, was the general store at the crossroads. It sold everything a family needed from food to clothing to fertilizer to caskets.”

— “Colleton County: A Pictorial History,” Chapter One: “Prehistoric Era and Colonial Period,” 1994

Story

In 2-Minnie Anna (Sister) Dodd Garris 1874-1957, 2-William B. Garris 1879-1949, 3-Wilhelmina (Bee) Garris King 1918-2007, Colleton County, S.C., FAMILY: BEE & BOB TOGETHER, FAMILY: MATERNAL LINE (BEE), FAMILY: PATERNAL LINE (BEE), Round O, S.C., Walterboro, S.C. on April 7, 2013 at 9:45 am

T he mail came to the post office early in the morning from Walterboro, bringing mail from everywhere. There were two RFD carriers from Round O, one going north to Canadys and one south to Jacksonboro. Making Round O about a 25 to 30 mile long strip. So after Mamma and/or Daddy would sort the mail , the carriers would sort theirs and go on their routes. They would have time to get back off their routes and my parents time to cancel all the outgoing mail before the carrier came back from Cottageville going to Walterboro and took that mail with him. All this went on with hearing my lessons, my studying, etc. feeding chickens, gathering eggs, milking cows, cleaning up the store , house and sweeping the yards.

— “The Way It Was,” Chapter Twelve: “THE STORE,” 1999

Photographs

In "Colleton County: A Pictorial History", 1930s & Before, Colleton County, S.C., POSTS, STORIES on April 7, 2013 at 9:43 am

colleton county a pictorial history page 97 country store in hiotts

“Hiott’s Store. William Hiott built this two-story frame store ca. 1870 at what is now known as Hiott’s Crossroads. Groceries, cloth and other general merchandise were sold downstairs. The second floor housed the ‘shoe department’ and served as the Masonic Hall. Hiotts was a farming community near Round O through which a logging train traveled. During the early part of the 20th century, there were warehouses, stores, and a depot. ”

colleton county a pictorial history page 63 country store in cottageville

“Cottageville: The Gulf station shown in this photo was the first store built in Cottageville before 1900. It was remodeled around 1937. Dr. George Pierce, an Englishman, ran the town’s store. It was he who changed the town’s name from Round O to Cottageville, after the Methodist minister, Reverend W.A. Durant called his home ‘Our Cottage Home.'”

colleton county a pictorial history page 72 country store in walterboro

“This 1930 picture is of the interior of Jones Store on Washington Street (in Walterboro), which sold feed and seed.”

colleton county a pictorial history page 98 country store in catholic hill

“This Catholic Hill store was typical of many country stores found throughout the county before the advent of the large supermarkets and convenience stores. In addition to staples, the stores carried bread, milk, cold drinks, and ‘penny candy.'”

colleton county a pictorial history page 33 country store in catholic hill

“Joe ‘Prune’ Brown waits on Father Aiken in a country store near Catholic Hill. Note Goody’s Toothache Powders priced at 2 powders for 5c.”

— “Colleton County: A Pictorial History,” 1994

Map

In "The Way It Was", STORIES on April 7, 2013 at 9:42 am

(Editor’s note: This map shows the towns in and around Round O, S.C., that Bee / Momma/ Grandma sometimes traveled to. More towns will be added as our story expands!)