kinggnik

Archive for June, 2013|Monthly archive page

Story

In "The Way It Was", 2-George William Stack 1888-1950, 2-Jessie Hodges Dodd 1892-1992, 3-Dorothy (Dot) Stack 1920-1984, 3-George William Stack 1925-, 3-Howard Garris 1906-1990, 3-John David Stack 1927-2001, 3-Julia Crider Garris 1909-2012, 3-Miriam Ellen Stack 1917-1997, 3-Wilhelmina (Bee) Garris King 1918-2007, Bee Stories, FAMILY: BEE & BOB TOGETHER, FAMILY: BROTHER & SISTERS (BEE), FAMILY: MATERNAL LINE (BEE), STORIES on June 23, 2013 at 7:35 am

In college Howard started going with Julia Crider who is now your Aunt Julia who lived in St. Matthews, SC.  When he used to go to see her I would go with him and spend a week with Aunt Jess who lived there also. Miriam and Dot were about my age and I enjoyed playing with  them. I remember the running games they  used to play  with friends and called it “Tag”.  They would chase each other and if they could catch you they  would touch or  tag you , and if you could catch them you would tag them, and run away from them.  I was not used to playing with children.  I really didn’t know how to play the game and remember thinking that it was about the dumbest game I had ever seen.

I remember sitting at Aunt Jess’s table at supper eating pimiento sandwiches .  We would hear the train coming, we’d jump up and run the 1/2 block to the trestle and watch the train go by . Also we would hike to Antley Springs and Aunt Jess would carry a large watermelon and we would cut it and eat it while we were there.  I enjoyed going up there very much.

– “The Way It Was,” Chapter 7: “My Brother Howard” 1999

Advertisements

Photograph

In 1930s & Before, 2-Annie (Gus) Dodd 1876-1955, 2-George William Stack 1888-1950, 2-Jessie Hodges Dodd 1892-1992, 3-Dorothy (Dot) Stack 1920-1984, 3-George William Stack 1925-, 3-John David Stack 1927-2001, 3-Miriam Ellen Stack 1917-1997, FAMILY: MATERNAL LINE (BEE), POSTS, St. Matthews, S.C. on June 23, 2013 at 7:05 am

stack house in st. matthews from george stack

(Editor’s note: This photo comes to us from George Stack. His caption reads: “STACK House in St. Matthews: Gus & Jessie.”)

Photograph

In 1930s & Before, 2-George William Stack 1888-1950, 2-Jessie Hodges Dodd 1892-1992, 3-Dorothy (Dot) Stack 1920-1984, 3-George William Stack 1925-, 3-John David Stack 1927-2001, 3-Miriam Ellen Stack 1917-1997, POSTS, St. Matthews, S.C. on June 23, 2013 at 7:03 am

stack family from george stack

(Editor’s note: This photo comes to us from George Stack. His caption reads: “STACK family: John David on lap, George Jr., Miriam and Dot. 1930.”)

Photograph

In 1930s & Before, 2-Lillie Luetta Dodd 1880-1955, FAMILY: MATERNAL LINE (BEE), POSTS on June 9, 2013 at 6:48 am

lillie luetta bobbie dodd

lillie luetta bobbie dodd BACK

(Editor’s note: The back of this photo reads “Aunt Bobbie.” The photographer’s stamp appears to read “S.M. Pearson, Woodruff, S.C.”)

Lemon Meringue Pie

In Uncategorized on June 9, 2013 at 6:48 am

1 1/2 C. sugar
3 tablespoon Cornstarch
3 egg yolks
3 tbsp buter
3 tbsp lemon juice
1 1/2 tbsp grated lemon rind
2 Cups water

Should be made in a double boiler unless you are very careful

Mix together sugar & cornstarch. Stir in boiling water, Cook over direct heat, stirring constantly until mixture thickens and boils. Beat egg yolks slightly & add a little of hot liquid. Then add egg mixture to hot liquid. Cook 5 mi. stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Blend in Butter, lemon juice & rind. Pour into cooled baked pie crust. Add meringue & bake until meringue is brown. 350 degrees for about 20 mi.

Meringue

3 egg white
3 tablespoons water
1/2 teaspoon Cream of tartar

Whip with electric beater until it stands in peaks. Add 3 teaspoon of sugar & whip well. Spread on pie & bake 375 f for 20 mi or until golden brown.

(Editor’s note: This recipe was originally posted here online in July 2009, along with a recipe for “Quickie” Lemon Meringue Pie. On the blue recipe card below, Grandma tags this recipe as “Low Country.” Could it have been Aunt Bobbie’s?)

recipe lemon meringue pie

recipe lemon meringue pie 2

recipe lemon meringue pie 3

recipe lemon meringue pie 4

Story

In "The Way It Was", 1-Adeline (Addie) Kizer Dodd 1855-1937, 1-Joseph Hoffman Dodd 1852-1937, 2-John (Jack) Hampton Kinsey 1876-1914, 2-Lillie Luetta Dodd 1880-1955, 2-Minnie Anna (Sister) Dodd Garris 1874-1957, 2-William B. Garris 1879-1949, 3-Addie Elizabeth (Addie) Kinsey 1906-1986, 3-Alma Geneva Kinsey 1911-, 3-Charity Blanche (Blanche) Kinsey 1908-1935, 3-Edna Arline Kinsey 1913-, 3-Jessie (J'Mae or Ditta) Garris 1914-2011, 3-Jessie Ray (Ray) Kinsey 1903-1942, 3-Verlie Virginia Kinsey 1901-1951, 3-Wilhelmina (Bee) Garris King 1918-2007, Bee Stories, FAMILY: BEE & BOB TOGETHER, FAMILY: BROTHER & SISTERS (BEE), FAMILY: MATERNAL LINE (BEE), FAMILY: PATERNAL LINE (BEE), STORIES on June 9, 2013 at 6:47 am

When we went to “town”, it was Charleston. We would say we were in town the other day. Beautiful city with personality, and charm all of it’s own. The property was sold and taxed by front footage on the street. So every body had a narrow deep lot which required a long narrow house to fit the lot so this was the way the Charleston house was born. It was a long narrow three story house with a porch on the side of 2nd and 3rd floors.. There was a front door at the top of the steps on second floor; so you could not go on the porch until someone let you in The bedrooms were on only one side of the house and a hall running down the other

Aunt Bobbie (one of Mamma’s sister ) had moved down there after her husband Jack Kinsey died leaving her with six daughters to raise. They had lived across the road from the Kinsey Cemetery where my Mamma and Daddy are buried. Aunt Bobbie ran a boarding house on King Street in one of those big Charleston Houses. The girls worked when they were old enough, Addie had a beauty parlor , Ray and Blanche worked for the Telephone Company, and the others found work where ever they could

We visited them in Charleston. I remember I was not afraid of the big city as long as I had Mamma with me. How safe and secure that made me feel. We used to take them Pork, vegetables and milk . Every time you went anywhere you were always holding a gallon of milk in your lap so it would not turn off and spill. I remember going to see them and I was wearing a brand new velvet dress Mamma made. The milk leaked somehow and before I knew it, I was soaked with milk. I went on but I did not have a change of clothes so I had to wear those clothes smelling of milk all day. No wonder that I do not like to drink milk. I was drowning in it.

Aunt Bobbie’s girls were older than J’Mae and I but they were always very nice to us. I can still remember the lemon meringue pies she always seem to have. I think she made them every day for her boarders because they were a favorite. Charleston had many lovely shops with so many people , trolley cars and movies. One day the girls took us to three movies .in one day. That was utmost as far as I was concerned.

In Charleston, they used to have colored (black) women vendors selling fresh vegetables, eggs, baskets that they had made early in the morning. You could hear them calling “Sievey Beans butter beans) ,okra, corn, tomatoes, peaches, squash, rutabagas, turnips, sweet potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, and the list went on. It may contain shrimp or fish. Aunt Bobbie would run out of the house and I would go with her and she would buy her fresh vegetables for the day.. The vendors are no longer there today. There were brick and cobblestone streets in Charleston.. All the new fads and fashions came out of Charleston in my eyes.

I had fine very straight hair. I thought if you had curly hair your problems were solved and you would have nothing else to worry about. Addie who now had her own beauty parlor said to me one day: “I’ve got some sample permanents which I need to try on someone. Next time you are in town, let me know and I will give you a permanent”. I went and she did and I would up with all this curly hair. I could not believe I had this permanent. They were given quite differently then. They filled your head with all these curlers and they had to stay in for about 15 or 20 minutes connected to electricity while it processed. It was quite an operation but I enjoyed the permanent a great deal.

– “The Way It Was,” Chapter 19: “Charleston, SC,” 1999

Story

In 1-Joseph Hoffman Dodd 1852-1937, 2-Annie (Gus) Dodd 1876-1955, 2-Minnie Anna (Sister) Dodd Garris 1874-1957, 3-James Carlton (Mike) Hill 1906-1955, 3-Wilhelmina (Bee) Garris King 1918-2007, FAMILY: BEE & BOB TOGETHER, FAMILY: MATERNAL LINE (BEE) on June 2, 2013 at 7:44 am

Aunt Gus was Mamma’s sister who lived at Round O and clerked in Grandpa’s store. Her name was Augusta and we all called her aunt Gus. When I used to make daily visits over there she would get me two Johnny cakes (slightly sweet crackers probably four inches in diameter ) and then cut a slice of cheese off of one of those wheels of cheese. Talk about being good, I will never again taste anything that good. I have searched for the Johnny cakes but you just can’t find them anymore. Aunt Gus was always very kind to me and I used to say that I wish I could be buried near to her because she would get me anything I needed. She would come to our store every day to get the mail and stay to talk and I always drank in every word she said. She was the Assistant Rural Route Mail Carrier and she would carry me on her route because she was afraid to travel alone. I was on the side to place the mail in the boxes as we went by. She would pay me a couple of dollars for going with her and I felt as if I was the richest person in the whole world. Aunt Gus was always doing nice things for you.

One summer I copied Aunt Gus’ family record that she had spent years getting together and I still have it. I’ve completed one line through the American Revolution that is the Fox line from Ireland. After Aunt Gus’ death, I asked Mike about her family records and he didn’t know anything about what happened to them . I know they must have been thrown out and I was so glad that I got her records earlier..

– “The Way It Was,” Chapter 18: “Aunt Gus and Uncle Tom Hill,” 1999

Photograph

In 1930s & Before, 2-Annie (Gus) Dodd 1876-1955, 2-Minnie Anna (Sister) Dodd Garris 1874-1957, FAMILY: MATERNAL LINE (BEE), POSTS on June 2, 2013 at 7:37 am

aunt gus minnie anna

aunt gus minnie anna BACK

(Editor’s note: The back of this photo reads “Minnie Dodd, Gus Dodd.”)

Story

In "The Way It Was", 2-Annie (Gus) Dodd 1876-1955, 2-Thomas Augustus (Tom) Hill 1875-1939, 3-James Carlton (Mike) Hill 1906-1955, 3-Jessie (J'Mae or Ditta) Garris 1914-2011, 3-Joseph Harold (Harry) Hill 1911-1922, 3-Wilhelmina (Bee) Garris King 1918-2007, Bee Stories, FAMILY: BEE & BOB TOGETHER, FAMILY: MATERNAL LINE (BEE), STORIES on June 2, 2013 at 7:36 am

Uncle Tom worked for Grandpa also . He ran the grits mill and the saw mill. Once he got caught in the belt of the saw mill and it cut his leg off. While he was recuperating. J’Mae and I went to see him every day taking him something that Mamma had fixed for him to eat.. He was a fun person to talk with , and he was always cutting fool with us. He would say something like: “Would you eat a dead chicken?” Of course we would say “No”. Then he would say “You mean you would catch a live chicken, bit his head off and eat him.” This would make you feel very nauseated with all this talk. So the next time we would come he would ask :”Would you eat dead chicken?” I remember thinking in my mind I’m going to outfox him this time and I would say “Yes”. He would then say something like: “You mean you would eat a dead chicken you found on the yard that had probably been lying there five days. and could have maggots in it and you would still eat it?” By this time you were just as nauseated as before. By next day he would have changed this around or had something going that he always had you regardless of what you answered. We had fun talking with him. The rest of his life he walked with peg leg. He operated a blacksmith shop where he shoed horses in the whole area. I have been there and seen him work with steel so hot the whole thing was red. He also operated his farm also. We used to go there to lots of the pinder (Peanut ) boilings and they would serve you peanuts in a vegetable bowl.

Mike (James Carlton ) her son was probably my closest cousin but he was more like Howard’s age.. After he finished the Citadel, he ran a chicken farm and went to Charleston two or three times a week to take his eggs, chickens etc. for sale. He would let me ride with him any time I wanted to go so I would go sometime and he would also sell our eggs that we had raised or bought in the store. There was a younger son Harold who was killed in an accident with a grits mills that Grandpa owned, but I do not remember him. Aunt Gus got burned out one time, losing their home and all earthly belongings with out any insurance

– “The Way It Was,” Chapter 18: “Aunt Gus and Uncle Tom Hill,” 1999