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Story

In "The Way It Was", 2-Annie (Gus) Dodd 1876-1955, 2-Thomas Augustus (Tom) Hill 1875-1939, 3-James Carlton (Mike) Hill 1906-1955, 3-Jessie (J'Mae or Ditta) Garris 1914-2011, 3-Joseph Harold (Harry) Hill 1911-1922, 3-Wilhelmina (Bee) Garris King 1918-2007, Bee Stories, FAMILY: BEE & BOB TOGETHER, FAMILY: MATERNAL LINE (BEE), STORIES on June 2, 2013 at 7:36 am

Uncle Tom worked for Grandpa also . He ran the grits mill and the saw mill. Once he got caught in the belt of the saw mill and it cut his leg off. While he was recuperating. J’Mae and I went to see him every day taking him something that Mamma had fixed for him to eat.. He was a fun person to talk with , and he was always cutting fool with us. He would say something like: “Would you eat a dead chicken?” Of course we would say “No”. Then he would say “You mean you would catch a live chicken, bit his head off and eat him.” This would make you feel very nauseated with all this talk. So the next time we would come he would ask :”Would you eat dead chicken?” I remember thinking in my mind I’m going to outfox him this time and I would say “Yes”. He would then say something like: “You mean you would eat a dead chicken you found on the yard that had probably been lying there five days. and could have maggots in it and you would still eat it?” By this time you were just as nauseated as before. By next day he would have changed this around or had something going that he always had you regardless of what you answered. We had fun talking with him. The rest of his life he walked with peg leg. He operated a blacksmith shop where he shoed horses in the whole area. I have been there and seen him work with steel so hot the whole thing was red. He also operated his farm also. We used to go there to lots of the pinder (Peanut ) boilings and they would serve you peanuts in a vegetable bowl.

Mike (James Carlton ) her son was probably my closest cousin but he was more like Howard’s age.. After he finished the Citadel, he ran a chicken farm and went to Charleston two or three times a week to take his eggs, chickens etc. for sale. He would let me ride with him any time I wanted to go so I would go sometime and he would also sell our eggs that we had raised or bought in the store. There was a younger son Harold who was killed in an accident with a grits mills that Grandpa owned, but I do not remember him. Aunt Gus got burned out one time, losing their home and all earthly belongings with out any insurance

– “The Way It Was,” Chapter 18: “Aunt Gus and Uncle Tom Hill,” 1999

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  1. What’s a “vegetable bowl” (i.e., what they put the peanuts into)?

  2. My mother, Carolyn Scott Flynt (Carey’s namesake), and my grandma Mamie Wilson Scott referred to “vegetable bowls” when speaking of serving dishes. They were the large bowls used to take up the cooked vegetables (green beans, corn, cabbage, okra, etc.) for passing around at the family meals. Only when I got old enough was I allowed to carry them to the table for they were always brimming over and very hot. YUM.

  3. This is the “Mike” with the big dog. I do remember that he was an adult when we went to visit, but I was kid at the time, so all big people were old :).

    I don’t remember his dad. But from Momma’s rememberance of his joking even after losing his leg, he must have been a remarkable character. Especially to lose his leg in an industrial accident, get a peg leg, and then keep on with his life in such a fun and purposeful manner.

    It does take a really hot shoe to bed properly in a horse’s hoof. I didn’t know you heated them to red, but that would make them seat pretty well.

    I used to really like when Momma served boiled peanuts. I don’t know why they’re not more widely available. You mostly see them when you drive along and come across a road-side stand. But I think they’re great.

  4. Ditto to Penny for the vegetable bowl… I think we are losing the term perhaps because we just fix our plates off the stove instead of properly serving a meal on the table with vegetable bowls? I have three of them in my grandmother King’s Desert Rose pattern and two that match my china.

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