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Archive for July, 2015|Monthly archive page

Butterbeans

In Uncategorized on July 30, 2015 at 10:23 am

Succotash

This is a very old dish, first served by the Indians to the white settlers in America.

1/2 cup sieva (or butter) beans
1/2 cup raw corn
2 tablespoons butter
1 1/2 cups water
1 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon pepper

Boil sieva beans until almost done, add tender raw corn, cut from cob, and cook until both are tender. Drain, add butter, seasoning and serve. Serves 4.

MRS. LOUIS T. PARKER (Josephine Walker)

(Editor’s note: There is no written recipe for butterbeans — also known as “lima beans” or “sievey beans” — among any of Bee / Momma / Grandma’s things. Do any of you know her recipe? 

We do have a multitude of butterbean recipes from cookbooks owned by both Bee / Momma / Grandma and her mother-in-law, Marion Reynolds King. The recipe typed out above is from “Charleston Receipts,” a cookbook put out by the Junior League of Charleston in 1950, and is the only printed recipe we have that calls these beans “sieva.”

The “South Carolina Cookbook,” published by the South Carolina Council of Farm Women in 1953, follows with a suggestion of lima beans in tomato sauce, and a “Lima One-Plate Luncheon” featuring apples and scooped-out beets. 

“P.T.A. Interpretations of Food,” a cookbook owned by Marion Reynolds Kings that was published in 1928 and passed along to us (held together with plenty of duct tape) by Sonny King, give us the most basic lima bean recipe we have, and one that as far as this editor remembers was closest to the recipe used by Bee / Momma / Grandma. This book also offers a “Lima Bean Loaf” — which, hmm, is a mystery.

Bee / Momma / Grandma’s most well-worn cookbook (the cookbook with no cover so we don’t know its name) adds recipes for lima beans with milk, lima beans with Neufchatel cream cheese, and hmm, another “Lima Bean Loaf” — this time with bacon fat and peanut butter.)

charlestonreceipts

recipe succotash charleston receipts copy

recipe lima one-plate luncheon

marion king cookbook cover 3

recipe lima beans pta

recipe lima bean loaf pta

recipe lima beans american woman copy

recipe lima bean neufchatel american woman

recipe lima bean loaf american woman

Story

In "The Way It Was", 2-Minnie Anna (Sister) Dodd Garris 1874-1957, 2-William B. Garris 1879-1949, 3-Evelyn Floy Garris 1910-1997, 3-Jessie (J'Mae or Ditta) Garris 1914-2011, 3-Wilhelmina (Bee) Garris King 1918-2007, Bee Stories, FAMILY: BEE & BOB TOGETHER, FAMILY: BROTHER & SISTERS (BEE), FAMILY: MATERNAL LINE (BEE), FAMILY: PATERNAL LINE (BEE), POSTS BY LOCATION, Round O, S.C., STORIES on July 30, 2015 at 9:39 am

I remember J’Mae and me taking dinner out  to the fields for Daddy and the other workers. When you had field helpers, you were expected to furnish their dinner.  It was usually so much for a day’s work and dinner. I can remember it being $1.00 per day and dinner. Mamma did all this cooking. I think  that I picked cotton  two or three days in my life. It is very hard work. You used a crocus bag with it tied around your neck and drug that through the fields  to fill with cotton.  Daddy paid us the same as other workers.  Mamma  did not like for us to work in the fields and be exposed to all the other workers and their filthy language.  However, Daddy always has a garden of over an acre and we girls always gathered vegetables late in the afternoon for our food  for the next day. This included butter beans (Of course in the low country, we called them ” sievey beans” (and I believe if you look it up that is the official name), okra, tomatoes, cucumbers, lettuce,  white squash, peas, string beans, etc.  We would all wear sun hats and long sleeves if possible.

— “The Way It Was,” Chapter Six: “MY DADDY,” 1999

Photograph

In 1930s & Before, 3-Jessie (J'Mae or Ditta) Garris 1914-2011, FAMILY: BROTHER & SISTERS (BEE), PHOTOS BY DECADE on July 30, 2015 at 9:38 am

jessie garris copy

jessie garris BACK

(Editor’s note: The back of this photograph says “Jessie Garris Young.” Jessie — also known as “J’Mae” by her siblings and cousins, and “Aunt Ditta” by Bobby, Boyd and Billy — was the third-oldest sibling in Bee / Momma / Grandma’s family, and born in 1914, about four years before Bee / Momma / Grandma. How old do you think she is here, and where do you think she might be? Take a guess, and then maybe we can date and place this photograph.)

Photograph

In 1930s & Before, 3-Evelyn Floy Garris 1910-1997, FAMILY: BROTHER & SISTERS (BEE), PHOTOS BY DECADE, POSTS on July 26, 2015 at 9:10 am

aaa321 copy

aaa322 copy

(Editor’s note: The back of this photograph says “Floy Garris.” Floy was the second-oldest sibling in Bee / Momma / Grandma’s family, and born in 1910, about eight years before Bee / Momma / Grandma. How old do you think she is here? Take a guess, and then maybe we can date this photograph.)

Story

In "The Way It Was", 2-Minnie Anna (Sister) Dodd Garris 1874-1957, 3-Evelyn Floy Garris 1910-1997, 3-Howard Garris 1906-1990, 3-Jessie (J'Mae or Ditta) Garris 1914-2011, 3-Wilhelmina (Bee) Garris King 1918-2007, Bee Stories, FAMILY: BEE & BOB TOGETHER, FAMILY: BROTHER & SISTERS (BEE), FAMILY: MATERNAL LINE (BEE), POSTS BY LOCATION, Round O, S.C., STORIES on July 26, 2015 at 9:07 am

In the summer it was completely  different, as the other children would be there then and Floy pretty well took over the cooking.  The fresh vegetables were in, we would go out  in the afternoon and pick enough vegetables for the next .day.   No refrigeration so  no left overs could be saved to eat ourselves but nothing was wasted.  We fed about two dozen cats and about three dogs.  Anything that they didn’t eat was poured together into what we called “slop” for the hogs. The hogs ate anything.  Sometimes we had to cook extra for the animals.

— “The Way It Was,” Chapter Twelve: “THE STORE,” 1999

Home-Made Soup

In 3-Wilhelmina (Bee) Garris King 1918-2007, 4-Boyd King Dimmock 1949-, FAMILY: BEE & BOB TOGETHER on July 26, 2015 at 9:06 am

Scraps & juices from Beef roast
2 cans tomato soup
1 can corn
1 can butter beans
6 irish potatoes, diced
1 pkg frozen orka (unless Boyd is eating)
2 carrots diced
Salt to taste

Bring all ingredients to boil then let simmer about an hour or until flavors have time to season. Freezes well.

(Editor’s note: Bee / Momma / Grandma says this recipe dates back to the Low Country, around the year 1930. What do you think — would they have used canned ingredients then, or fresh ones? Or would this be cans of vegetables they’d canned themselves?

This must mean Aunt Boyd doesn’t like okra.)

recipe home-made soup

Fried Chicken

In "Charleston Receipts" 1950, "P.T.A. Interpretations of Food" 1928, "South Carolina Cookbook" 1953, "The American Woman's Cookbook" 1939, 2-Marion Reynolds King 1893-1958, 3-Wilhelmina (Bee) Garris King 1918-2007, FAMILY: BEE & BOB TOGETHER, FAMILY: MATERNAL LINE (BOB), SOURCES on July 22, 2015 at 6:35 am

1 fryer (1 1/2 to 2 1/2 lbs.)
1 cup flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
Fat for frying

Dress and disjoint fryer. Chill in ice box overnight, if possible. Sift flour and mix with salt and pepper. Pour flour mixture in paper bag and add several pieces chicken to this at a time, to coat chicken with flour. Have 2 inches of grease in large hot frying pan. When all chicken is in, cover for 5-7 minutes. Uncover and turn chicken when underside is golden brown. Cover again for 5-7 minutes, then remove top and cook until bottom side is brown. Reduce heat and cook 20 minutes longer. Turn chicken only once.

FRIED CHICKEN GRAVY
Pour off most of the fat, leaving the brown crumbs. Add a little flour and brown. Add hot water and stir until smooth and thickened. Season with salt and pepper.
MRS. HARRY SALMONS (Rosamond Waring)

(Editor’s note: There is no written recipe for fried chicken among any of Bee / Momma / Grandma’s things. Do any of you know her recipe? 

We do have these four fried chicken recipes from cookbooks owned by both Bee / Momma / Grandma and her mother-in-law, Marion Reynolds King. The recipe typed out above is from “Charleston Receipts,” a cookbook put out by the Junior League of Charleston in 1950. The other cookbooks that are scanned in below add the following tips:

The “South Carolina Cookbook,” published by the South Carolina Council of Farm Women in 1953, says that you can season the chicken as described above, or instead beat an egg with a tablespoon of water and dip the raw chicken pieces in that, then roll the pieces in fine dry bread crumbs or corn meal. This book also suggests two methods of frying, one in “shallow fat” (a half inch or more) and the other in “deep fat” (“enough to cover the chicken without overflowing the kettle”). When frying in deep fat, you can use either the egg-and-crumb coating described above or instead make a batter of 1 egg, 3/4 cup milk, 1 cup sifted flour and 1/2 teaspoon salt. The Farm Women also suggest finishing the fried pieces in a “moderate oven” heated to 300 degrees.

Bee / Momma / Grandma’s most well-worn cookbook (the cookbook with no cover so we don’t know its name) adds the clause: “If chicken is not young, parboiling before baking will shorten the cooking time.”

“P.T.A. Interpretations of Food,” a cookbook owned by Marion Reynolds Kings that was published in 1928 and passed along to us (held together with plenty of duct tape) by Sonny King, adds tips on how to cut up a whole chicken and several other variations on frying. It says definitively: “Fried chicken is ‘the dish’ of the South. It may be served at breakfast, luncheon, dinner, or supper, for a family meal or for a distinguished guest. It is particularly suited for a picnic, in fact no picnic is complete without it.”)

charlestonreceipts

recipe fried chicken charleston receipts

recipe fried chicken sc cookbook 1 recipe fried chicken sc cookbook 2 recipe fried chicken sc cookbook 3 recipe fried chicken sc cookbook 4

recipe fried chicken wellworn cookbook

marion king cookbook cover 3

recipe fried chicken pta interpretations

Story

In "The Way It Was", 2-Minnie Anna (Sister) Dodd Garris 1874-1957, 3-Evelyn Floy Garris 1910-1997, 3-Jessie (J'Mae or Ditta) Garris 1914-2011, 3-Wilhelmina (Bee) Garris King 1918-2007, Bee Stories, FAMILY: BEE & BOB TOGETHER, FAMILY: BROTHER & SISTERS (BEE), FAMILY: MATERNAL LINE (BEE), POSTS BY LOCATION, Round O, S.C., STORIES on July 22, 2015 at 6:21 am

I could pretty well pick up any chicken on the yard because I had this way of waving my arms that utterly confused the chickens to the point  I could pick them up. When we had chicken to eat, Mamma or Floy  would chop their heads off,  but J’Mae and I had plenty of practice in the cleaning of  them. that consisted of scalding in boiling water so that the feathers would come off, removing the feathers, singeing for down fuzz, giving them a bath with soap and then cutting them up.  The feathers and down were saved for pillows and bedding.  Everyone wanted a soft feather bed.

— “The Way It Was,” Chapter 3: “My Elementary Schooling,” 1999

Story

In "The Way It Was", 2-Minnie Anna (Sister) Dodd Garris 1874-1957, 3-Wilhelmina (Bee) Garris King 1918-2007, Bee Stories, FAMILY: BEE & BOB TOGETHER, FAMILY: MATERNAL LINE (BEE), POSTS BY LOCATION, Round O, S.C., STORIES on July 22, 2015 at 6:19 am

On Sunday morning Mamma would always get up early, kill a couple of chickens and go through that process of cleaning them and fry  them for breakfast with grits and gravy.  She would some times have country style steaks with grits and gravy also for Sunday morning  breakfast.

— “The Way It Was,” Chapter Twelve: “THE STORE,” 1999

Photograph

In 1930s & Before, 2-Elizabeth (Bess) Dodd 1885-1980, 2-Jessie Hodges Dodd 1892-1992, 2-Minnie Anna (Sister) Dodd Garris 1874-1957, 3-George William Stack 1925-, 3-Joseph Capers Hiott 1908-1939, 3-Wilhelmina (Bee) Garris King 1918-2007, 4-Julia Helen Garris 1937-2011, FAMILY: BEE & BOB TOGETHER, FAMILY: BROTHER & SISTERS (BEE), FAMILY: MATERNAL LINE (BEE), PHOTOS BY DECADE, POSTS, POSTS BY LOCATION, St. Matthews, S.C. on July 19, 2015 at 8:50 am

chickens aunt bess

chickens aunt bess BACK

(Editor’s note: We first posted this photo of Aunt Bess feeding chickens a few years ago, before we started exploring Bee / Momma / Grandma’s childhood or had heard many of the Aunt Bess stories. You can read all the comments you made back then about this photo here. As cousin Julia Helen Garris noted, Aunt Bess Dodd Hiott was a sister of Bee / Momma / Grandma’s mother, Minnie Anna Dodd Garris (Aunt Sister), and lived in St. Matthews near another sister, Aunt Jess Dodd Stack. Said Julia Helen: “Aunt Bess was lady-like, fun, loving, somewhat soft spoken, while Aunt Jess was mischievous, told dirty stories, kept a great part of St. Matthews laughing, and managed to raise 4 fine children.” One of those four children, George Stack, is on our email list! Does anybody have any idea as to where this photo would have been taken? Would it have been Round O or St. Matthews?)